Mental models, worldviews, and mocha

By Gordon Rugg

Mental models provide a template for handling things that happen in the world.

At their best, they provide invaluable counter-intuitive insights that let us solve problems which would otherwise be intractable. At their worst, they provide the appearance of solutions, while actually digging us deeper into the real underlying problem.

In this article, I’ll use a cup of mocha as an example of how these two outcomes can happen. I’ll also look at how this relates to the long-running debate about whether there is a real divide between the arts and the sciences as two different cultures.

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Passive ignorance, active ignorance, and why students don’t learn

By Gordon Rugg

Why don’t students learn?

It looks like a simple question, which ought to have a simple answer. In reality, understanding why students don’t learn takes us into concepts such as passive ignorance, active ignorance, systems theory, belief systems, naïve physics and cognitive biases. In this article, I’ll skim through some key concepts, to set the scene for a series of later articles that go into more depth about those concepts and about their implications both for education and for other fields.

bannerBucket image copyleft Hyde & Rugg, 2014; other images from Wikimedia (details at the end of this article)

 

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