Literature reviews

By Gordon Rugg

Almost every academic article begins with a literature review. As is often the case in academia, this is a rich, sophisticated art form, whose complexities are often invisible to novices. As is also often the case in academia, there are usually solid, sensible reasons for those complexities. As you may already have guessed, these reasons are usually not explained to students and other novices, which often leads to massive and long-lasting misunderstandings.

This article looks at the nature and purpose of literature reviews. It also looks at some forms of literature review which are not as widely known as they should be.

It’s quite a long article, so here’s a picture of a couple of cats as a gentle start.

cats on sofa

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Representing argumentation via systematic diagrams, part 1

By Gordon Rugg

This article is a short introduction to some basic principles involved in representing argumentation, evidence and/or chains of reasoning using systematic diagrams.

This approach can be very useful for clarifying chains of reasoning, and for identifying gaps in the evidence or in the literature.

As usual, there’s an approach that looks very similar, but that is actually subtly and profoundly different, namely mind maps. That’s where we’ll begin.

A mind mapSlide1

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